You’re in the zone blasting enemies and sudden your character just falls over and dies! What a killjoy, today we’ll talk about visualizing damage to help give your players visual cues on on when they’ve take damage or are very close to death. The best way to show this is through particle systems (or animated sprites if you’re working in a 2D game) changing the pose/animation of your player’s character to limp/stagger to show they’re low on health.

This article will use a very basic particle system to represent the damage. There are much better articles and resources on Unity’s…


Juice or “game feel” is the intangible but tactile feedback associated when playing games. Enemies exploding in a shower of particles, screen shudder, and other small but satisfying forms of feedback can help create a more polished and engaging game, separating what a boring otherwise static game into something addictive.

This article will cover specifically the juiciest of feedback, camera shake. When used correctly it can create some of the most engaging game feel with a few simple lines of code but if used incorrectly can make players feel nauseous. Worse yet it can be perceived as annoying and turn…


You’ve got your game, enemies are coming at you fast and furious. You’re blasting them to pieces but what’s that? No explosion? No feedback? No good! In this tutorial we’ll cover triggering enemy explosions in the context of a 2D game, this should also be valid for a 3D game but with a bit more tweaking.

Start by opening an existing Unity project or starting a fresh one. Here’s a test sprite we can use courtesy of Open Game Art (here) Drop it into your project folders and let’s get started. Make sure the sprites are labelled as such by…


In this tutorial we’ll be covering a simple level loading system. Once you’ve reached a certain level of complexity in your game making abilities you’ll want to expand past single stage games into multiple levels. By the end of this you’ll not only to be able to switch scenes but do so in a way that is extensible and easy to maintain.

First start by opening an existing project or a fresh one and then start by creating a new empty object in the Hierarchy named Level Manager. This will be the brains of your new loading system. …


It’s happened, your player kicks the bucket. Eventually it happens but fear not we can make an awesome game over screen so they can get back to the fight in your game. In this article we’ll cover making a dead simple game over screen using Unity’s UI system.

First start by opening up or start a fresh Unity project. Right click in the Hierarchy and select UI > Panel this will then create Panel for our Game Over screen as well as populate the Hierarchy with a Canvas and Event System.


User Interface is arguably the most important aspect of your game as it is the first and last thing they interact with when they play your game. Learn how easy it is to craft functional and aesthetically pleasing UI Elements. In this article we’ll go over how to craft a simple score text.

Start by opening up Unity to an existing project or a new project if you don’t have one. …


In this article we’ll talk about switch statements, a useful tool in your toolbox. So what’s a switch statement and how does it differ from an if/else block?

Let’s go to Microsoft Docs (here) on the subject, along with the Unity Scripting API this is very helpful for getting quick (if sometimes dense) explanations on C#. “switch is a selection statement that chooses a single switch section to execute from a list of candidates based on a pattern match with the match expression.”

That seems pretty straight forward, unlike a if/else statement which uses a series of boolean checks to…


In this article we’ll explore making a modular power-up system for your game. This way you can have a single script acting as a container for every power up you make instead of making a ton of different and unique ones. Start by opening up Unity or creating a new project.

First we’ll start by creating an empty object called Speed Boost in the Hierarchy, and then we’ll create a Script called (you guessed it) PowerUp this will act as the container for our power-ups in the game. Attach PowerUp to Speed Boost before we forget like so.


In this article we’ll talk about determining how long power ups should last when making your game. When you work on your game it won’t be long before you start tweaking your power ups, pick ups, or other collectibles and some of the most basic game design techniques involve just determining how long something should last.

First things first, determine the intent of your game. Do you want to make the player powerful? Do you want them to have brief respite? Is it temporary? Is it permanent? Does it have drawbacks? …


In this article we’ll briefly go over animating a simple sprite in Unity. This already assumes you have a project set up and ready to go (if not go here to do that) as well as a sprite. If not you can grab the one I’m using (here just grab one of the PNGs) to follow along.

So first things first, you’ll want to make sure the texture sheet you’re working with is a Sprite 2D and you can check that by clicking the texture and looking in the inspector. Change the Texture Type to Sprite if not. Then set…

Antonio Delgado

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